Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
News articles of interest (EU politics)
#11
Criminal investigation against the former board of Slovenia's national central bank

Keeping them to account (at the national level) - news from Slovenia:

NBI files criminal complaint related to bank bailout (24 Dec 2018)
The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) filed a criminal complaint on suspicion of abuse of office related to the 2013 bank bailout, the police told the STA on Monday. Unofficially, the complaint has been filed against all then board members of the central bank.
https://english.sta.si/2589313/nbi-files...nk-bailout

I could not find any more detailed news in English. The board includes the former governor of our national central bank Jazbec - they are now subject to criminal charges.

This is a follow-up to these news more than two years ago:

ECB threatens legal action against Slovenia after police raid (6 July 2016)
The European Central Bank threatened to take legal action against Slovenia on Wednesday after police seized documents from the country’s central bank in a rare conflict between authorities and one of the euro zone’s most respected institutions.
https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-sloven...KKCN0ZM2H0

Slovenia investigates central bank chief, rebuffs ECB (7 July 2018)
Slovenian prosecutors put central bank chief Bostjan Jazbec under investigation for possible “criminal abuse of office” in a 2013 bank overhaul and rebuffed calls to return seized documents in a rare, escalating fight with the European Central Bank.
Police confiscated documents in a raid at the Bank of Slovenia, part of the ECB’s network of euro zone central banks, taking files from Jazbec, some staff members and a former deputy governor in a pre-criminal investigation.
ECB President Mario Draghi immediately condemned the move, asking European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker to intervene and threatening legal action for an infringement of the ECB’s legal privileges and immunities.

https://www.reuters.com/article/slovenia...SL8N19T3W1

We'll see what happens 'after holidays'. In May 2018, our Constitutional Court rejected complaints from our national central bank and the ECB. Some more explanation of the background:

They Want Their Money Back: Investors Push Back on EU Bailout (9 Sep 2018)
Slovenia’s 2013 bank rescue is being challenged by those forced to take losses on their holdings
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...k-eu-clash

Well, the thing is that EU members are sovereign - so meddling of the ECB, the European Commission etc. is toothless when faced with our national law.

To be honest, I do not have much hope that this criminal investigation will result in 'locking them up' - our klepto-elites tend to have very good lawyers which have in rather many cases taken the accused perpetrators off the hook for 'technical issues' etc. (although we did manage to lock up a few of them).
Reply
#12
The EU and Euro Keep Defying the Doomsayers (3 Jan 2019)
Is the end nigh? History would suggest not.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...doomsayers
Reply
#13
From Poland:

Liberal mayor of Poland's Gdansk dies after stabbing (14 Jan 2019)
Pawel Adamowicz, the liberal mayor of the Polish city of Gdansk, died on Monday of his wounds a day after being stabbed by a former convict who rushed the stage during one of Poland’s biggest annual charity events.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-polan...SKCN1P81HP

A sad day - another senseless political murder in the EU. We should stand together and not allow political murders and violence to get normalised (again).

Solidarity with the people of Gdansk and Poland.
Reply
#14
From Greece:

Greek government coalition implodes over Macedonia name deal (13 Jan 2019)
Defense Minister Panos Kammenos says he is pulling his party’s support for the government.
Greece's defense minister, Panos Kammenos, announced Sunday he is pulling his party out of government in protest at an agreement between the country and Macedonia aimed at ending a decades-long dispute over the latter's name, Reuters reported.
Greece and Macedonia struck a deal in June agreeing that the Balkan country will be renamed the Republic of North Macedonia to distinguish it from Greece's northern region, also called Macedonia...
The move comes in response to a vote in Macedonia's parliament Friday, in which MPs backed the name change in an effort to unblock the path to NATO and EU membership — something Greece has hitherto thwarted.
https://www.politico.eu/article/macedoni...name-deal/

Greek PM Tsipras to face confidence vote Wednesday (14 Jan 2019)
Syriza leader expected to survive vote in parliament.
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras will face a vote of confidence in parliament after his government's junior coalition partner quit in disagreement over a deal to end a name dispute with Macedonia.
Debate will begin on Tuesday, with a vote late Wednesday, and Tsipras is expected to receive enough support in parliament...
Tsipras, whose Syriza party has 145 seats in the 300-seat parliament, as well as the support of one independent lawmaker, only needs the backing of a handful of MPs to survive.
Greece will hold a parliamentary election this fall.
https://www.politico.eu/article/greek-pm...me-change/

So a coalition of left/right extremists implodes - over a retro-nationalistic issue. Who would have thought.
Reply
#15
(14-01-19, 11:06 PM)Ajda Slovenia Wrote: From Greece:
Greek government coalition implodes over Macedonia name deal (13 Jan 2019)
Greek PM Tsipras to face confidence vote Wednesday (14 Jan 2019)

Update:

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras wins confidence vote
(16 Jan 2019)
The vote came after a key minister in the Greek government quit last week over the Macedonia name dispute. Prime Minister Tsipras said he would put the ratification of the Macedonia name-change agreement on the agenda.
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras on Wednesday won a confidence vote in parliament, just days after the country's governing coalition collapsed.
Tsipras received the minimum 151 votes he needed from the parliament for his government to survive.
Speaking after the vote, Tsipras said winning a vote of confidence was a vote for stability in Greece...
Panos Kammenos, the defense minister in Tsipras' government who leads the small nationalist Independent Greeks (ANEL) party, was the latest minister to quit the coalition over a proposed name-change agreement with neighboring Macedonia.
Greece has been blocking Macedonia from joining NATO and the European Union for a decade over the name row.
https://www.dw.com/en/greek-prime-minist...a-47113131

Hopefully this will move the Greece-Macedonia rather silly name dispute (with a lot of retro-nationalistic emotions and demagoguery on both sides) one step in the right direction. Although I am not betting on it - in particular because Greece has EU elections in May, followed by parliamentary elections in the autumn.
Reply
#16
If you know any potential candidates, inform them about this opportunity:

European Commission traineeship applications are open! Hands-on experience to young graduates in a multicultural environment that’s shaping the future of Europe. Sounds good? You have until 4 February to apply.
https://twitter.com/Moedas/status/1084004840248872960

More info here:

Blue Book Traineeship website  Exclamation  
Each year the European Commission offers 2 five month, paid traineeships, for 1,300 trainees; administrative or translation.
Starting on 1 March or 1 October, trainees gain hands-on experience of EU policy making in a multicultural environment.
Registration is open
REGISTRATION OPEN FOR THE OCTOBER 2019 SESSION
FROM: 10th January 2019 - UNTIL: 4th February 2019 (12:00, Brussels time)
https://ec.europa.eu/stages/?utm_campaig...34bb017890
Reply
#17
Sweden Forms a Government (without nazis)

Good morning!

I am back from being sick and exhausted, but I come bearing good news! Sweden has formed a government, and it's as we had hoped for, a cross-centre one without support or agreement with the nazis (aka Sweden Democrats, the Tories' EP friends). It would appear that while the English-language press is super-fond of writing about "catastrophic elections" and how "Sweden fails to form a government" afterwards, when Sweden does form a government, they still have to talk shit about it. We're used to it. 

Anyway, there aren't many English-language articles on the subject because it appears Americans and Brits dislike it that we get our house in order while they were so enjoying pointing fingers at us, but I have found one. Even the headline is snarky.  Listen, bozos, at least our state employees have been paid salary during those 133 days, so how about shutting the fuck up and cleaning your house instead?

Sweden Forms a Government After 133 Days, but It’s a Shaky One  (New York Times, Jan 19, 2019)
Reply
#18
(21-01-19, 10:49 AM)Ashtaret Wrote: Sweden Forms a Government (without nazis)

Good morning!

I am back from being sick and exhausted, but I come bearing good news! Sweden has formed a government, and it's as we had hoped for, a cross-centre one without support or agreement with the nazis (aka Sweden Democrats, the Tories' EP friends). It would appear that while the English-language press is super-fond of writing about "catastrophic elections" and how "Sweden fails to form a government" afterwards, when Sweden does form a government, they still have to talk shit about it. We're used to it. 

Anyway, there aren't many English-language articles on the subject because it appears Americans and Brits dislike it that we get our house in order while they were so enjoying pointing fingers at us, but I have found one. Even the headline is snarky.  Listen, bozos, at least our state employees have been paid salary during those 133 days, so how about shutting the fuck up and cleaning your house instead?

Sweden Forms a Government After 133 Days, but It’s a Shaky One  (New York Times, Jan 19, 2019)

Hi Ashtaret - glad you are back and feeling better - you were missed! Congratulations on your Government and never mind about the snide comments - they only make them 'cause they can't find a broom big enough to clean their houses.  Big Grin
Reply
#19
What is fate of non-euro EU states after Brexit?

The UK's withdrawal from the EU will heighten fears of marginalisation among the 'euro-outs', that is, the eight member states that have not adopted the euro.

The appointment of some candidates from eurozone countries such as Slovakia, Slovenia or the Baltic States to key EU positions could convey the message that the political and financial risk of joining the euro is one worth taking.
Reply
#20
Sabine Weyand elogy in The Guardian.

Sabine Weyand: the EU Brexit negotiator with a British sense of humour

Weyand, who this week shot down UK hopes of reopening talks, has a reputation for being ‘direct, quick, with no bullshit’
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)