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News articles of interest (Brexit)
#61
A bit more historic background on the EU strategy.
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#62
(31-10-18, 08:17 PM)Antarctican Wrote: An interesting piece on the possible EU  strategy behind the negotiations.

Yep, that seems to be Brussels' strategy. Wait until the UK is as good as falling over the cliff edge and then offer a "friendly" hand, at a cost of course. Nothing focuses the mind more than pain.

The biggest danger here is that Brussels might be underestimating the UK's steadfastness and determination:

"...key EU leaders think they can take the risk, confident it would only last a matter of days before the UK had to seek a deal."

A matter of days? I know my country well, Brits can be extremely bloody minded and stubborn when they think a third party is putting them under pressure. In such a scenario there is a good possibility that the country closes ranks and resists and rather eats grass than yield. So it will depend on perspectives. If the nation thinks Whitehall is responsibly, yes, then only a few days will go by before the UK comes meekly back to the negotiation table. But if Brussels is held responsible for all the pain then reckon with months and even a year before the UK makes a move, and it might not be the one Brussels expects.
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#63
Considering that the strategy of the uk is "we are so important that we will have what we want and more", I'm not sure that the strategy "wait until the uk is on his knees, the british will be more accommodating" seems to be a bad strategy.
The EU has the best hand and it knows this. Of course the EU will take a hit but a far less bad than the uk.
The EU will be able to manage a no deal not the uk !
As the brexiters like to say "It's worth it"
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#64
(01-11-18, 08:36 PM)RightLeft Wrote: A matter of days? I know my country well, Brits can be extremely bloody minded and stubborn when they think a third party is putting them under pressure. In such a scenario there is a good possibility that the country closes ranks and resists and rather eats grass than yield. So it will depend on perspectives. If the nation thinks Whitehall is responsibly, yes, then only a few days will go by before the UK comes meekly back to the negotiation table. But if Brussels is held responsible for all the pain then reckon with months and even a year before the UK makes a move, and it might not be the one Brussels expects.

Well I have heared that before, but I wonder if that is still the case or if that is something of the past. A few generations have been born since that has last been tested of course. Life was harder then which means the contrast will be bigger now.

Besides, the only alternative for the EU is to yield and undermine its single market if not the institute itself. I can't see that happening.
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#65
(02-11-18, 03:28 AM)Antarctican Wrote: Well I have heared that before, but I wonder if that is still the case or if that is something of the past. A few generations have been born since that has last been tested of course. Life was harder then which means the contrast will be bigger now.

Besides, the only alternative for the EU is to yield and undermine its single market if not the institute itself. I can't see that happening.

Of course the UK is not the country of earlier times, people have become comfortable. We'll see how people take the bad times if and when they come.

Just to put these bad times into perspective. In 2008 the subprime disaster caused economic growth in the North East of the UK (Yorkshire and Sunderland) to fall 2%. Thousands lost there jobs, homelessness doubled, a quarter of shops, pubs and banks closed for lack of custom.

Forecasts now say that a hard brexit will cause economic growth to fall by 16% in the North East, eight times worse than in 2008!
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#66
For anyone who still wonders what exactly went on during the brexit dinner with May and Juncker at Downing Street when Juncker made his now famous remark, "I'm ten times more sceptical than before" here an excellently translated article from the Frankfurter Allgemeine (FAZ):

http:/m.faz.net/aktuell/politik/theresa-may-jean-claude-juncker-and-the-disastrous-brexit-dinner-14998803.html

"The Disastrous Brexit Dinner"
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#67
(02-11-18, 04:16 PM)RightLeft Wrote: http:/m.faz.net/aktuell/politik/theresa-may-jean-claude-juncker-and-the-disastrous-brexit-dinner-14998803.html

"The Disastrous Brexit Dinner"

That link forwards to http://ww8.http.com/ and shows a blank page.
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#68
Try this guy. It worked for me.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/there...98803.html
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#69
(02-11-18, 04:51 PM)Ravi Iyer Wrote: Try this guy. It worked for me.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/there...98803.html

Nope. You get spam about turning your ad blocker off, which is not gonna happen.

However, prepending URLs with 'www.outline.com/' often helps,
so here is the link, shortened, without ads, without ad blocker block:

https://outline.com/bBJPEs
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#70
(02-11-18, 04:09 PM)RightLeft Wrote: Of course the UK is not the country of earlier times, people have become comfortable.

Sadly the British people have been 'comfortable' (= abandoning their democratic duties of being well-organised drivers of democratic change) for decades and indeed centuries. They have been happily uncritically gobbling up the lies served by the aggressive British brainwashing machine about the UK being ever so very democratic, indeed the best and most admired democracy in the world, for a very long time. They completely failed to notice that for centuries (ever since the US adopted its constitution) no nation in the world has copied 'democracy' from the UK - except from some ex British colonies immediately after claiming independence, where most have moved on in the meantime and made their own democratic changes (including adopting proper written constitutions).

Brexit is just a symptom - the real UK's problems are much deeper.

RightLeft, the above is not intended to be 'bashing of the British people' - just an observation about the UK being left behind (supported by a lot of objective evidence, as I am sure you know). Accepting the reality and critically analysing the actual situation is a prerequisite for action and change for the better.
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