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The best Brexit quotes and other not too serious things
#1
The best Brexit quotes and other not too serious things

When you come across some interesting Brexit statements, you can deposit them here for others to enjoy - and as a historical record.  Wink
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#2
Michel Barnier:
 
"Keep calm and negotiate!" (4 April 2017 - waiting for the UK to crawl to the negotiating table)
 
"I can't negotiate with myself." (12 June 2017 – still waiting for the UK to crawl to the negotiating table)
 
"I hear no whistling - only the clock ticking." (12 July 2017, in response to Boris Johnson’s “go whistle” re the financial settlement)
 
"Brexit means Brexit - everywhere." (21 November 2017, in response to Brexiters’ claim that the Brexit UK will keep financial passporting)
 
On 8 December 2017, after May had signed the Joint Report (on which she later reneged):
British journalist: "Are you going to be celebrating, Mr Barnier? Crack open the champagne?"
Barnier: "No, we’re still working. No champagne. Into negotiations, you have to bring water."
 
“Backstop means backstop.” (8 June 2018, after receiving the UK’s proposal for a ‘temporary’ backstop)
 
“Single market means single market.” (29 August 2018, at a press conference in Germany)
 
Ha ha ha. Barnier is just great.
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#3
Tusk, magic cakes and Salzburg

Donald Tusk on instagram about the Salzburg summit:
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn8Luwbjzf9/?hl=en&taken-by=donaldtusk

Note Tusk's comment: "A piece of cake, perhaps? Sorry, no cherries."   Big Grin


Tusk is now an expert  Wink  for magic cakes. Remember this:

Tusk in a speech at the European Policy Centre in Brussels, 13 October 2016 (= two years ago):

“Finally, let's move on to Brexit. As for the negotiations, the situation is pretty clear. Its framework will be set out by the European Council - that is by the guidelines foreseen in the [Lisbon] Treaty. Our task will be to protect the interests of the EU as a whole and the interests of each of the 27 member states. And also to stick unconditionally to the Treaty rules and fundamental values. By this I mean, inter alia, the conditions for access to the single market with all four freedoms. there will be no compromises in this regard.

When it comes to the essence of Brexit, it was largely defined in the UK during the referendum campaign. We all remember the promises, which cumulated in the demand to "take back control". Namely the "liberation" from European jurisdiction, a "no" to the freedom of movement or further contributions to the EU budget. This approach has definitive consequences, both for the position of the UK government and for the whole process of negotiations. Regardless of magic spells, this means a de facto will to radically loosen relations with the EU, something that goes by the name of "hard Brexit".

This scenario will in the first instance be painful for Britons. In fact, the words uttered by one of the leading campaigners for Brexit and proponents of the "cake philosophy" was pure illusion: that one can have the EU cake and eat it too. To all who believe in it, I propose a simple experiment. Buy a cake, eat it, and see if it is still there on the plate.

The brutal truth is that Brexit will be a loss for all of us. There will be no cakes on the table, for anyone. there will be only salt and vinegar. If you ask me if there is any alternative to this bad scenario, I would like to tell you that yes, there is. And I think it is useless to speculate about "soft Brexit" because of all the reasons I've mentioned. These would be purely theoretical speculations. In my opinion, the only real alternative to a "hard Brexit" is "no Brexit". Even if today hardly anyone believes in such a possibility. We will conduct the negotiations in good faith, defend the interests of the EU 27, minimise the costs and seek the best possible deal for all. But as I have said before, I am afraid that no such outcome exists that will benefit either side. Of course it is and can only be for the UK to assess the outcome of the negotiations and determine if Brexit is really in their interest.”

http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/...peech-epc/


And it surely is interesting to read Tusk's words again, two years later ... they were ridiculed in the UK back then as 'scaremongering'.
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#4
It is interesting that Tusk does not offer a Norway option in that speech. As a remainer who thinks that to go against the Referendum result risks civil unrest, I think the UK gov ought to be honest and say that is the only option that can preserve the integrity of the whole UK. It affirms the economic union but not the political one that people are afraid of. The difficult thing to sell would be the free movement of people.
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#5
I agree with you. CU/SM would of course be the best solution for the UK. It would not insult the future.

FoM should be adressed by implemented by the rules in an efficient way. ID cards. control of employment... There are many examples in other UE countries. But I think that the question is too passionate to deal with it only with reasonable measures.

The UK is paying dearly for the unpreparedness of the Leave project and its unability to understand the other negotiating side, as Salzburg has spectacularly shown.
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#6
At Weslian: "Tusk does not offer a Norway option in that speech... the UK gov ought to be honest and say that is the only option that can preserve the integrity of the whole UK"--

Weslian, Tusk offered what what possible according to the UK's own red lines. No single market, no customs union, no freedom of movement of labour, no ECJ means a 'hard' Brexit 

Note that Norway is not enough to preserve the integrity of the UK. Note that there are border posts with customs controls on the Sweden-Norway border. The only scenario keeping the Irish land border 'invisible' is Norway plus. The options available to the UK are explained here:

Brexit scenarios available to the UK: solving the riddle of Irish land border
http://debateuncensored.x10host.com/foru....php?tid=3

Have a look at the two tables which explain the options including the customs regime they require.

PS: I think it would be better if you continue your discussion about border regimes and UK integrity at the Brexit scenarios thread where you will be able to engage with others interested in this issue.  Smile
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#7
Juncker's recent comments

In the Austrian parliament on 5 October 2018: 

“Negotiations are not easy because we also have to be critical that we receive different signals from London. There is a polyphonic chorus at the level of the British cabinet and we try to arrange the pieces ... so that they become a melody.”

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britai...KKCN1MF13M


In an interview with Austrian media on 5 October 2018:

"I do not interfere in inner-cabinet debates in the UK. There is enough confusion."

"The British press is such that I will not miss it."

"I am always amazed about what I am always blamed for."

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/o...ss-freedom
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#8
Dancing skills: May vs Juncker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CErT_VFcayw

The Dancing Queen got standing applause.
The Dancing King got laughter and applause.

Juncker was not mocking Theresa May’s dance moves, says Commission (8 October 2018)
Juncker was speaking at a Committee of the Regions event when, upon hearing a short burst of music, he started dancing.
https://www.politico.eu/article/jean-cla...ommission/

Doing a May? Dancing Juncker gets a laugh
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-brita...SKCN1MI1ME


Twitter reply from Margaritis Schinas, European Commission's chief spokesperson to a question about Juncker's dance by James Crisp (Telegraph):

Relax James. Without a song or a dance what would our life be ? Not directed at anyone, improvisation on the moment as the music kept playing before he could start his speech...

https://twitter.com/MargSchinas/status/1...8303282176

Schinas' comment is a reference to ABBA line "Without a song or a dance what are we?" from the song Thank You For The Music. Schinas really should brush up on ABBA lyrics - I am most disappointed about highly imperfect ABBA knowledge of those unelected eurocrats. What are we paying them for if they cannot even learn ABBA lyrics properly?


As usual, the most entertaining thing about it all is reaction of the British media:

Jean-Claude Juncker appears to MOCK May by dancing on stage as he delivers speech in Brussels amid rising Brexit tensions
Jean-Claude Juncker risked fuelling Brexit tensions today by appearing to mock Theresa May's dancing. The EU commission chief sparked laughter by doing some PM-style boogying before delivering a speech in Brussels...
After performing his bop on stage, Mr Juncker dove straight into taking a swipe at the English language.He said: 'I will not express myself in English. I will do it, I do it again and again, but English is not the only official language of the EU. And with things as they are I will express myself in French, maybe in Luxembourgish, but by respect for the public I will concentrate on the French language.'
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article...ssels.html

KNOWING ME KNOWING EU Jean-Claude Juncker mocks Theresa May by dancing on stage during Brussels speech
JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker today mocked Theresa May as he danced on stage in an echo of her party conference speech. The top Eurocrat did a jig to his entrance music as he started a speech in Brussels. The audience at the Committee of the Regions meeting laughed as they recognised the dig at Britain's PM... Mr Juncker's mockery of Mrs May is the latest in a string of public digs at the UK from senior European leaders.
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/7445610/to...ls-speech/

Juncker 'MOCKS' Theresa May dance moves as he REFUSES to speak in English
Mr Juncker appeared to mimic Theresa May's Tory Conference dance moves ahead of his speech in Brussels in which the European Commission President claimed some populists in Europe were "stupid"...
Mr Juncker then took a swipe at Britain by telling his audience that he preferred to make his speech in French or Luxembourgish, his native tongue, spoken by fewer than half a million people, rather than English.
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/102852...sts-speech

Farage defends Juncker’s dance ‘mocking’ Theresa May
Nigel Farage reveals that despite being a eurosceptic he is ‘not outraged’ by Jean-Claude Juncker’s dance ‘mocking’ Theresa May. Saying he ‘found it rather funny.’
https://www.express.co.uk/videos/558749/...heresa-May
Note: There is a video of Farage's comment at the above link.


Well, if the British media analysed any of the many EU27's official Brexit documents as carefully and in great detail as they do each little joke and fleeting remark of the EU27 leaders, the British people would not be as poorly and misleadingly informed about what is going on as they are.
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#9
...Well, if the British media analysed any of the many EU27's official Brexit documents as carefully and in great detail as they do each little joke and fleeting remark of the EU27 leaders, the British people would not be as poorly and misleadingly informed about what is going on as they are.
[/quote

But Ajda ...the EU 27's Brexit documents are HARD!! Trying to analyse them gives us BRAIN-ACHE. Much better to stick to analysing dancing - we've practised that watching 'Strictly'.
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#10
German take on Brexit (including dancing)

In the meantime on the continent, here is a German take on Brexit 
- start watching at 18 min 29 sec:

heute-show vom 5. Oktober 2018 (ZDF)
https://www.zdf.de/comedy/heute-show/heu...8-100.html

If you don't understand German, just watch for a minute or so (the dancing part). See also the Germans explaining to the Brits the difference between being IN and OUT of the EU (using a Boris Johnson sock puppet) - at 21 min 17 sec.

Big Grin
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